10 R functions for Linux commands and vice-versa

10 R functions for Linux commands and vice-versa

File Manipulation, R, System Administration
This post will go through 10 different Linux commands and their R alternatives. If you're interested in learning more R functions for working with files like some of those below, also check out this post. How to list all the files in a directory Linux R What does it do? ls list.files() Lists all the files in a directory ls -R list.files(recursive = TRUE) Recursively lists all the files in a directory and all sub-directories ls | grep "something" list.files(pattern = "something") Lists all the files in a directory containing the regex "something" R [code lang="R"] list.files("/path/to/directory") list.files("/path/to/do/directory", recursive = TRUE) # search for files containing "something" in their name list.files("/path/to/do/directory", pattern = "something") # search for all CSV files list.files("/path/to/do/directory", pattern = ".csv") [/code] Linux [code lang="bash"] ls /path/to/directory…
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How to run R from the Task Scheduler

How to run R from the Task Scheduler

R, System Administration
In a prior post, we covered how to run Python from the Task Scheduler on Windows. This article is similar, but it'll show how to run R from the Task Scheduler, instead. Similar to before, let's first cover how to R from the command line, as knowing this is useful for running it from the Task Scheduler. Running R from the Command Line To open up the command prompt, just press the windows key and search for cmd. When R is installed, it comes with a utility called Rscript. This allows you to run R commands from the command line. If Rscript is in your PATH, then typing Rscript into the command line, and pressing enter, will not result in an error. Otherwise, you might get a message saying "'Rscript'…
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R: How to create, delete, move, and more with files

R: How to create, delete, move, and more with files

File Manipulation, R, System Administration
Though Python is usually thought of over R for doing system administration tasks, R is actually quite useful in this regard. In this post we're going to talk about using R to create, delete, move, and obtain information on files. How to get and change the current working directory Before working with files, it's usually a good idea to first know what directory you're working in. The working directory is the folder that any files you create or refer to without explicitly spelling out the full path fall within. In R, you can figure this out with the getwd function. To change this directory, you can use the aptly named setwd function. [code lang="R"] # get current working directory getwd() # set working directory setwd("C:/Users") [/code] Creating Files and Directories…
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Running Python from the Task Scheduler

Running Python from the Task Scheduler

Python, System Administration
Running Python from the Windows Task Scheduler is a really useful capability. It allows you to run Python in production on a Windows system, and can save countless hours of work. For instance, running code like this previous article about scraping stock articles on an automated, regular basis, could come in handy as new stock articles are posted. Before we go into how to schedule a Python script to run, you need to understand how to run Python from the command line. Just press the windows key and type cmd into the search box to make the command prompt come up. Suppose your python script is called cool_python_script.py, and is saved under C:\Users. You can run this script from the command prompt by typing the below line: python C:\Users\cool_python_script.py If…
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File Manipulation with Python

File Manipulation with Python

File Manipulation, Python, System Administration
Getting started Python is great for automating file creation, deletion, and other types of file manipulations.  Two of the primary packages used to perform these types of tasks are os and shutil.  We'll be covering a few useful highlights from each of these. [code lang="python"] import os import shutil [/code] How to get and change your current working directory You can get your current working directory using os.getcwd: [code lang="python"] os.getcwd() [/code] Any actions you take without specifying a directory will be assumed to be associated with your current working directory i.e. if you create or search for a file without specifying a directory, Python will assume you're in the value of os.getcwd(). To change your working directory, use os.chdir: [code lang="python"] os.chdir("C:/path/to/new/directory") [/code] How to merge a directory name…
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